GEIN 316 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Innovative Design Strategies
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEIN 316
Fall/Spring
2
2
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to expose students to design processes and methods for innovative new product development. Students will engage in strategic thinking and research into, for example, the political, economic, social and technological contexts of new products, services or systems. As the outcome of the course, students will propose product concepts and product specifications that are intended for further development.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • The students who succeeded in this course: • Will be able to interpret information that is relevant to a product development problem. • Will be able to execute field research that is relevant to a product development problem. • Will be able to make effective oral and visual presentations of their product development research and of their proposed product concepts. • Will be able to apply techniques to share their ideas in group work. • Will be able to synthesize market trends considering the political, economic, social, and technological developments for innovative product concepts.
Course Content This course will consist of design problems concentrating particularly on the early phases of new product development. Students will work individually or in groups and proceed in stages along a new product development process. They will employ a number of tasks including planning, creative thinking, desk and field research, product concept design, design concept development, preparing and making presentations, and composing business proposals. At the end of the course, students will produce an innovative product concept.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 19 February - INTRODUCTION - Course Introduction and Overview - “Design Ladder” Syllabus
2 26 February - THE CREATIVE ECONOMY AND DESIGN THINKING - Creative Economy and Today - Introduction to Design Thinking - On Human Creativity - General Principles of Service Design Reading: Tim Brown (2008). Design thinking. Harvard Business Review, 86(6), 84-92.
3 4 March - VIDEO SCREENING - Distribution of Presentation 1 Subjects and Student Groups: Design Strategies Case Studies None
4 11 March - DESIGN STRATEGIES Design Strategies Case Studies - What is Strategy? - What is Strategic design? - Strategic Design Practice - How to Translate Strategy to Design - Changing Roles of Designers Reading: Rohan Doherty, Cara Wrigley, Judy Matthews, and Sam Bucolo (2014). Climbing the design ladder: Step by step. In Proceedings of the 19th DMI Academic Design Management Conference, London, pp. 2578-2600.
5 18 March - DESIGN STRATEGIES Presentation 1: Design Strategies Case Studies Submission PRESENTATION 1
6 25 March - DESIGN STRATEGIES Presentation 1: Design Strategies Case Studies (cont.) Submission PRESENTATION 1
7 1 April - LIVE OR DIE: INNOVATIVE IDEA FAILURES - Idea Failures Case Studies - Distribution of Presentation 2 Subjects and Student Groups: Creative/Innovative Communications - “Brand Positioning” Analysis Example (Video Screening) Reading: Michael B. Beverland and Francis J. Farrelly (2010). What does it mean to be design-led? Design Management Review, 18(4), 10-17.
8 8 April - CREATIVE / INNOVATIVE COMMUNICATIONS - Presentation 2 Pin-up Sessions and Review Submission PRESENTATION 2
9 15 April - CREATIVE / INNOVATIVE COMMUNICATIONS - Presentation 2 Pin-up Sessions and Review (cont.) - Distribution of Project Subjects and Student Groups: Design strategies for global issues Submission PRESENTATION 2 - PROJECT Brief
10 22 April - CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM IN INDUSTRIES - Service Design Methods and Tools - In-class Study: Discussion and Brainstorming Brief and Mindmap
11 29 April - CREATIVE EXPERIENCES - In-class Study: System Map Ecosystem Map
12 6 May - CREATIVE EXPERIENCES - In-class Study: System Map Ecosystem Map
13 13 May - CREATIVE EXPERIENCES - In-class Study: User Journey Map User Journey Map
14 20 May - CREATIVE EXPERIENCES - Term Project Pin-up Session and Review PROJECT SUBMISSION
15 CREATIVE EXPERIENCES - Term Project Pin-up Session and Review PROJECT SUBMISSION
16 Review of the Semester None

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

-

Suggested Readings/Materials

Bruce, Margaret and J R Bessant. 2002. Design in Business : Strategic Innovation Through Design. Harlow, England ; London ; New York: Financial Times/Prentice Hall.Keinonen, Turkka and Roope Takala. 2006. Product Concept Design : A Review of the Conceptual Design of Products in Industry. New York]: Springer.Kelley, Tom and Jonathan Littman. 2001. The Art of Innovation : Lessons in Creativity From IDEO, America's Leading Design Firm. New York: Currency/Doubleday.Riley, Patrick G. 2002. The OnePage Proposal : How to Get Your Business Pitch Onto One Persuasive Page. New York: ReganBooks.Schifferstein, H and Paul, Hekkert. 2008. Product Experience. San Diego, CA: Elsevier.Snyder, Carolyn. 2003. Paper Prototyping: The Fast and Easy Way to Design and Refine User Interfaces. San Francisco: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers.Squires, Susan and Bryan Byrne. 2002. Creating Breakthrough Ideas : The Collaboration of Anthropologists and Designers in the Product Development Industry. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.Stanton, Neville. 2005. Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics Methods. Boca Raton: CRC Press.Suri, Jane Fulton and Matthew Marsh. 2000. “Scenario Building as an Ergonomics Method in Consumer Product Design.” Applied Ergonomics, vol. 31:151157. Elsevier Science Ltd.Van der Heijden, Kees. 2005. Scenarios : The Art of Strategic Conversation. Chichester, West Sussex ; Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
2
60
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
4
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
2
32
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
2
Study Hours Out of Class
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
2
15
Project
1
16
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
110

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to define and discuss the history, underlying concepts and theories of cinema and digital media.

2

To be able to develop a storytelling idea for cinema and digital media arts by using creativity and critical thinking.

3

To be able to operate specialized technical equipment and competently use software in the fields of cinema and digital media arts. 

4

To be able to execute the main tasks in the pre-production, production and post-production of an audio-visual work at the basic level including screenwriting, production planning, operating the camera, sound recording, lighting and editing.

5

To be able to perform a specialized task at an advanced level either for pre-production, production or post-production of an audio-visual work.

6

To be able to discuss how meaning is made through works of cinema and digital media; in what ways economics, politics and culture affect visual representation; how the conditions of production, consumption, distribution and interpretation shape images.

7

To be able to perform specialized tasks for creating digital media narratives with interactive elements.

8

To be able to conduct a critical analysis of a film or a work of digital media arts from technical, intellectual and artistic points of view.

9

To be able to take individual responsibility of a film or a digital media work from scratch to product in a problem-solving manner.

10

To be able to work as a crewmember by following norms of ethical conduct and taking initiative to improve the ethical standards of his/her working environment.

11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Cinema and Digital Media and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest