GEAR 211 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Communication, Literature and Philosophy
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEAR 211
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This module aims to introduce students to analytic thinking and philosophizing via short readings and analysis of literary texts, art works, photography and cinema.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • explain the parallels between the history of philosophy and the history of communication/art/literature
  • compare the changes and developments in philosophical thinking with the changes and developments of the means and methods of communication
  • evaluate the role of literary texts in providing answers to the major philosophical questionscompare
  • compare the changes and developments in philosophical thinking with the changes and developments of the means and methods of communication provide
  • provide answers to the question of the extent to which the fundamental questions of Western philosophy, including being, subject and consciousness, have determined the practices of communication, art and literature
  • explain the links between different philosophical currents and the main analytic methods of the discipline of communications, including rhetoric, semiotics, discourse analysis and content analysis
  • explain the effects of binary oppositions that lie at the foundations of Western philosophy on the development of literature and arts in particular, and of communications and culture in generalrelate the creation of literary and artistic works to the knowledge derived from the ethical, aesthetical and political spheres of philosophy.
Course Content This course focuses on the historical trajectory of western philosophy in parallel to its relations particularly with literature and art, and generally with culture and communications.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and an overview of the course, course organization, requirements and methods of evaluation.
2 Essential Questions of Philosophy: Ancient Greece Clerk, ‘Ancient Philosophy, in Kenny, 1-53
3 Introduction to Philosophy of Modern Times ‘Descartes to Kant’, in Kenny, 107-193
4 Enlightenment, Modernity and Reason Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose; ‘Descartes’ in Russell, 511-520, Umberto Eco, ‘The Return of the Middle Ages’ in Eco,Travels in Hyperreality, 59-86
5 Modernity, Science, Progress and Dangers Mary Shelley, Frankenstein. Descartes in Russell, 511-520
6 Discussion on the Consequences of Modernization 'Descartes to Kant' in Kenny, 107-193.
7 Consciousness, Identity and Freedom: Lord and Bondsman Orhan Pamuk, The White Castle. ‘Hegel’ in Kenny 201 -206.
8 Discussion on Lord/Bondsman and East/West Hegel’ in Kenny 201 -206. Hall, ‘The West and the Rest’ (Handout)
9 Ethics: Modern and Postmodern Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment. ‘Kantian Morality’, in Kenny, 190-192; ‘Nietzsche’, in Kenny 216-221
10 Modernity and Social Injustice John Steinbeck, Grapes of Wrath Movie: Germinal ‘ Marx and the Young Hegelians’ & ‘Capitalism and its Discontents’, Kenny, 304-309. Russell, Ch. XXVII. Karl Marx
11 Modernity, Power, Bureaucracy and Surveillance Franz Kafka ‘The Trial’ Movie ‘Kafka’ SEP ‘Weber’; SEP ‘Foucault’ (Handouts)
12 Rousseau: “Natural Man” and Degeneration Joseph Conrad, ‘Heart of Darkness’ Movie ‘Apocalypse Now’ Quinton ‘Rousseau’ in Kenny 329-332 Freud, ‘Civilization and Its Discontents’ (Handout)
13 Existentialism Albert Camus, The Stranger. Existentialism,SEP
14 Philosophy and Psyche Franz Kafka ‘Metamorphosis’ Yusuf Atılgan ‘Anayurt Oteli’ & Movie Modules on Freud (Handout) Kenny, .’Sigmound Freud’, pp. 343-350.
15 Review of the Semester
16 Revision

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Robert C. Solomon and Kathleen M. Higgins, The Big Questions:  A Short Introduction to Philosophy.

Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy,

Sir Anthony Kenny, An Illustrated Brief History of Western Philosophy.

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP)

Suggested Readings/Materials

Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

Orhan Pamuk, The White Castle

Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment

Franz Kafka ‘The Trial’

Joseph Conrad, ‘Heart of Darkness’

Franz Kafka ‘Metamorphosis’

Yusuf Atılgan ‘Anayurt Oteli’

Albert Camus, The Stranger

John Steinbeck, Grapes of Wrath

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
30
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
2
60
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
15
5
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
Presentation / Jury
Project
20
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
2
10
Final Exam
    Total
143

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to define and discuss the history, underlying concepts and theories of cinema and digital media.

2

To be able to develop a storytelling idea for cinema and digital media arts by using creativity and critical thinking.

3

To be able to operate specialized technical equipment and competently use software in the fields of cinema and digital media arts. 

4

To be able to execute the main tasks in the pre-production, production and post-production of an audio-visual work at the basic level including screenwriting, production planning, operating the camera, sound recording, lighting and editing.

5

To be able to perform a specialized task at an advanced level either for pre-production, production or post-production of an audio-visual work.

6

To be able to discuss how meaning is made through works of cinema and digital media; in what ways economics, politics and culture affect visual representation; how the conditions of production, consumption, distribution and interpretation shape images.

7

To be able to perform specialized tasks for creating digital media narratives with interactive elements.

8

To be able to conduct a critical analysis of a film or a work of digital media arts from technical, intellectual and artistic points of view.

9

To be able to take individual responsibility of a film or a digital media work from scratch to product in a problem-solving manner.

10

To be able to work as a crewmember by following norms of ethical conduct and taking initiative to improve the ethical standards of his/her working environment.

11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Cinema and Digital Media and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest