GENS 207 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Scientific Thinking and Society
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GENS 207
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives What is science? How to differentiate scientific and non-scientific information? Why is scientific thinking so important for our society? Understanding evolution and natural selection provides a great example of scientific and non-scientific thinking. Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection completely changed the way humans approach the study of life. Understanding the implications of Darwin’s theories and uncovering the details of evolutionary processes greatly accelerated after evolution was united with genetics. Today, we have the potential to directly intervene with the evolutionary processes by using modern scientific tools. How will these tools affect the evolution of humans and other organisms in the future? The aim of this lecture is to provide a fundamental understanding of evolution and natural selection by emphasizing scientific thinking.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Students who successfully complete this course will be able to;
  • Explain scientific information, use sources to reach scientific information, and differentiate scientific and non-scientific information
  • Explain the fundamental principles of evolution, natural selection and genetic drift, and discuss how scientific thinking is used to describe these terms
  • Describe and discuss the evolution of humans, brain, ageing and death
  • Explain how humans intervene with the evolutionary processes by using modern scientific tools
  • Explain how evolutionary thinking is used to understand human diseases
  • Discuss the future of human evolution
Course Content Understanding evolutionary processes by emphasizing scientific thinking.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction and Course Overview.
2 The nature of science. What is science? What is the difference between science and non-science? Donald R. Prothero. Evolution : what the fossils say and why it matters. New York : Columbia University Press, [2017]. ISBN 9780231180641(hardcopy). ISBN 9780231543163 (electronic).
3 The evolution of evolution: Who is Darwin? Evolution before and after Darwin Donald R. Prothero. Evolution : what the fossils say and why it matters. New York : Columbia University Press, [2017]. ISBN 9780231180641(hardcopy). ISBN 9780231543163 (electronic).
4 Fishes can walk, dinosaurs can fly: fossil records of evolution. Donald R. Prothero. Evolution : what the fossils say and why it matters. New York : Columbia University Press, [2017]. ISBN 9780231180641(hardcopy). ISBN 9780231543163 (electronic).
5 Natural selection. Robert J. Richards. The Cambridge Companion to the “Origin of Species”. Cambridge University Press. Online ISBN: 9781139002363. 2009.
6 Midterm
7 Genetic drift. Douglas J. Futuyma and Mark Kirkpatrick. Evolution. Oxford University Press. ISBN: 9781605357409. 2017.
8 Human evolution. Roger Lewin. Human Evolution: An Illustrated Introduction. 5th Ed. Blackwell Publishing. ISBN 1-4051-0378-7.
9 Evolution of the brain and cognitive abilities. Shigeru Watanabe, Michel A. Hofman, Toru Shimizu. Evolution of the Brain, Cognition, and Emotion in Vertebrates. Springer Japan. eBook ISBN 978-4-431-56559-8. Hardcover ISBN. 978-4-431-56557-4. 2017.
10 Coevolution, endosymbiosis and microbiome. Douglas J. Futuyma and Mark Kirkpatrick. Evolution. Oxford University Press. ISBN: 9781605357409. 2017. Jason Tetro, Emma Allen - Vercoe The Human Microbiome Handbook. DEStech Publications. ISBN-10: 1605951595 ISBN-13: 978-1605951591. 2016.
11 Intervening evolution: Genome editing, directed evolution and unnatural selection. Jennifer A. Doudna, Samuel H. Sternberg. A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. ISBN-10: 9780544716940 ISBN-13: 978-0544716940. 2017. Nathaniel Comfort. The Science of Human Perfection: How Genes Became the Heart of American Medicine. Yale University Press. 0300198191, 9780300198195. 2014.
12 The evolution of ageing and death. Stanley Shostak. The Evolution of Death: Why We Are Living Longer (Suny Series in Philosophy and Biology). State University of New York Press; 1 edition. ISBN-10: 0791469468. ISBN-13: 978-0791469460. 2006. Michael R. Rose. Evolutionary Biology of Aging. ISBN-10: 0195095308, ISBN-13: 978-0195095302. Oxford University Press. 1994.
13 The future of human evolution. Scott Solomon. Future Humans: Inside the Science of Our Continuing Evolution. Yale University Press. ISBN 0300224508, 9780300224504. 2016.
14 Evolutionary medicine. Peter Gluckman et al. Principles of Evolutionary Medicine. Oxford University Press ISBN: 9780191083396. 2016.
15 General discussion and conclusion.
16 Final examination

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Recent popular and scientific literature 

Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
2
25
Homework / Assignments
2
20
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
25
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
5
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
2
4
Homework / Assignments
2
4
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
20
Final Exam
1
30
    Total
146

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to define and discuss the history, underlying concepts and theories of cinema and digital media.

2

To be able to develop a storytelling idea for cinema and digital media arts by using creativity and critical thinking.

3

To be able to operate specialized technical equipment and competently use software in the fields of cinema and digital media arts. 

4

To be able to execute the main tasks in the pre-production, production and post-production of an audio-visual work at the basic level including screenwriting, production planning, operating the camera, sound recording, lighting and editing.

5

To be able to perform a specialized task at an advanced level either for pre-production, production or post-production of an audio-visual work.

6

To be able to discuss how meaning is made through works of cinema and digital media; in what ways economics, politics and culture affect visual representation; how the conditions of production, consumption, distribution and interpretation shape images.

7

To be able to perform specialized tasks for creating digital media narratives with interactive elements.

8

To be able to conduct a critical analysis of a film or a work of digital media arts from technical, intellectual and artistic points of view.

9

To be able to take individual responsibility of a film or a digital media work from scratch to product in a problem-solving manner.

10

To be able to work as a crewmember by following norms of ethical conduct and taking initiative to improve the ethical standards of his/her working environment.

11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Cinema and Digital Media and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest