GEMC 203 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Computer and Society
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEMC 203
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course explores the social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and the impact of technology on society as well as how society has shaped, used, and responded to new technologies. With a computer scientist's perspective, and with historical context for many issues, it covers the issues students will face both as members of a technological society and as professionals in computer-related fields. A primary goal is to develop computer professionals who understand the implications of what they create and how it fits into society at large.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Focus on solutions to computer-related problems from technology and from markets, management, and law.
  • Compare risks and problems of computer technology with other technologies and non-computerized alternatives.
  • Learn historical background on many technological issues.
  • Analyze ethical issues facing today's computer professionals.
  • Discuss how computers change established institutions and conventions.
Course Content

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Changes and Developments in Technology Baase Chapter 1
2 Privacy and New Technology Baase Chapter 2
3 Freedom of Speech and Regulating Communications Media Baase Chapter 3
4 Intellectual Property and Copyright Infringement Baase Chapter 4
5 Free Software. Patents for Inventions in Software Baase Chapter 4
6 What is Hacking? Stealing Identities. Biometrics. Baase Chapter 5
7 When Digital Actions Cross Borders. Commercial Law Baase Chapter 5
8 Midterm
9 Telecommuting. Employee Communication and Monitoring Baase Chapter 6
10 Neo-Luddite Views of Computers, Technology, and Quality of Life Baase Chapter 7
11 Intelligent Machines and Superintelligent Humans. End of the Human Race? Baase Chapter 7
12 Failures and Errors in Computer Systems. Trust the Human or the Computer? Baase Chapter 8
13 Professional Ethics and Responsibilities Baase Chapter 9
14 Review of the Semester
15 Review of the Semester
16 Review of the Semester

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
A Gift of Fire: Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues for Computing Technology, 4/E, Sarah Baase, Prentice Hall, 2013, ISBN-10: 0132492679, ISBN-13: 9780132492676
Suggested Readings/Materials

Lecture Powerpoints and Testbank available at the publisher’s website will be provided.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
20
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
30
Final Exam
1
40
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
6
60
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
6
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
4
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
12
Final Exam
1
13
    Total
165

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to define and discuss the history, underlying concepts and theories of cinema and digital media.

2

To be able to develop a storytelling idea for cinema and digital media arts by using creativity and critical thinking.

3

To be able to operate specialized technical equipment and competently use software in the fields of cinema and digital media arts. 

4

To be able to execute the main tasks in the pre-production, production and post-production of an audio-visual work at the basic level including screenwriting, production planning, operating the camera, sound recording, lighting and editing.

5

To be able to perform a specialized task at an advanced level either for pre-production, production or post-production of an audio-visual work.

6

To be able to discuss how meaning is made through works of cinema and digital media; in what ways economics, politics and culture affect visual representation; how the conditions of production, consumption, distribution and interpretation shape images.

7

To be able to perform specialized tasks for creating digital media narratives with interactive elements.

8

To be able to conduct a critical analysis of a film or a work of digital media arts from technical, intellectual and artistic points of view.

9

To be able to take individual responsibility of a film or a digital media work from scratch to product in a problem-solving manner.

10

To be able to work as a crewmember by following norms of ethical conduct and taking initiative to improve the ethical standards of his/her working environment.

11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Cinema and Digital Media and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest