GEHU 303 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Ecology, Politics, Planetary Thinking
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEHU 303
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce key issues, major themes, and pressing problems concerning environmental politics and ecological thinking. Massive scale expansion of urban areas; irreversible processes of deforestation and environmental degradation caused by the idea of “infinite growth”; careless urbanization and suburbanization; local and global threats posed by the climate change; and transnational impacts of changing public consumption habits into blind consumerism; all of these developments in the past few centuries address that in our age, the human-nature relationship takes place in the form of an “ecological crisis,” meaning the time for taking significant steps towards rethinking of this relationship. In this respect, this course offers students to comprehend various issues of politics of environment from the perspective of “planetary thinking,” which acknowledges contributions of conventional approaches; but it also brings a new approach by studying “human life” and “human health” in relation to planetary health that includes animal health, environmental/ecological health, and biodiversity.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • define major shifts and developments in history on the relationship between human and nature leading to the age of global ecological crisis;
  • explain the interconnectedness between society and ecology in the sense of how society is affected by the environmental problems
  • compare and contrast the actions of various actors in ecological crisis;
  • develop a critical understanding on different opinions, attitudes, and actions of ecological movement at individual and collective levels;
  • examine the processes on how societal development, economic growth, and industrialization can take place in a positive-sum relationship with ecological progress and planetary health;
  • develop solutions for the problems posed by the ecological crisis through taking steps towards planetary thinking.
Course Content This course will develop in three parts. In the first part, we are going to spend some time in understanding the “ecological crisis” by looking at its symptoms and reasons, also climate denialism, and the idea of “planetary thinking” and “planetary health.” In the second part, we are going to elaborate on the critical perspectives towards the idea of environmental justice with an emphasis on green philosophy and politics as well as international cooperation on sustainability and ecological enhancement. We will devote the final part of the course on current debates.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the course: Ecology as a political issue Presentation and an overview of the course syllabus
2 What is “ecological crisis”? Modernity and human domination over nature Anthropocentrism Michael Paul Nelson, Jeremy T. Bruskotter, John A. Vusetich, “Does nature have value beyond what it provides humans?”, The Conversation, 2 Oct 2015 Carter. (2007), pp. 1-10 and Cp. 1, pp. 13-40. O'neill O. Environmental values, anthropocentrism and speciesism. Environmental Values. (1997) May 1:127-42.McDonald M. “Climate Change and Security: Towards Ecological Security”. International Theory. 2018;(Issue 2): 153-180.
3 Ecological Crisis and the Anthropocene Hamilton et al. (2015). Cp. 1. “Thinking the Anthroposcene”, pp. 1-13. Adam Vaughan, “Human impact has pushed Earth into the Anthropocene, scientists say”, The Guardian, 7 Jan 2016. Litfin, K., “Planetary Politics”, In Agnew, J.A., Mitchell, K. and Toal, G. eds., 2008. A companion to political geography. (pp. 470-482) John Wiley & Sons.Horton, R., Beaglehole, R., Bonita, R., Raeburn, J., McKee, M. and Wall, S., 2014. From public to planetary health: a manifesto. https://unfccc.int/climate-action/momentum-for-change/planetary-health https://planetaryhealthalliance.org/planetary-health Julia Pyper, “Why Conservative White Males Are More Likely to Be Climate Skeptics”, The New York Times, 5 Oct 2011 4
4 Movie Screening - Before the Flood (2016)
5 Climate Change Urry, J., 2015. “Climate change and society”. In Why the social sciences matter (pp. 45-59). Palgrave Macmillan, London.
6 MIDTERM
7 Green political thought Carter (2007) Cp. 3, pp.41-81.
8 Environmental justice + Green parties Mohai, Paul, David Pellow, and J. Timmons Roberts. 2009. “Environmental Justice”. Annual Review of Environment and Resources 34: 405-430. Carter (2007) Cp. 4.pp. 87-115.
9 Ecological movements: Yesterday and today Carter (2007) Cp. 6-7.pp.143-206.
10 PRESENTATIONS
11 PRESENTATIONS
12 Individual actions for sustainable life (green consumerism, veganism) McDonald M. “Climate Change and Security: Towards Ecological Security”. International Theory. 2018;(Issue 2): 153-180. James Dong, “Why individual action matters for the environment”, Medium, Dec 2016. Annie Leonard, “Individual Actions Just Don’t Add Up to Environmental Change”, The New York Times, 14 Dec 2012 George Monbiot, “I’ve converted to veganism to reduce my impact on the living world”, The Guardian, 9 Aug 2016.
13 Collective actions for sustainability Carter (2007) Cp. 6-7.pp.143-206.
14 Current Discussions: Thinking Renewables + Turkey's Climate Policy TBA
15 Review of the semester
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Selected Chapers from:

Carter, Neil (2007) The Politics of the Environment: Ideas, Activism, Policy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hamilton, C., Gemenne, F., & Bonneuil, C. (Eds.). (2015). The Anthropocene and the global environmental crisis: Rethinking modernity in a new epoch. Routledge.

The course reading package is available at Ekonomik Kırtasiye (just across the back door of university campus).

Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
25
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
35
Final Exam
1
40
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
2
60
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
1
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
8
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
10
Final Exam
1
18
    Total
100

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to define and discuss the history, underlying concepts and theories of cinema and digital media.

2

To be able to develop a storytelling idea for cinema and digital media arts by using creativity and critical thinking.

3

To be able to operate specialized technical equipment and competently use software in the fields of cinema and digital media arts. 

4

To be able to execute the main tasks in the pre-production, production and post-production of an audio-visual work at the basic level including screenwriting, production planning, operating the camera, sound recording, lighting and editing.

5

To be able to perform a specialized task at an advanced level either for pre-production, production or post-production of an audio-visual work.

6

To be able to discuss how meaning is made through works of cinema and digital media; in what ways economics, politics and culture affect visual representation; how the conditions of production, consumption, distribution and interpretation shape images.

7

To be able to perform specialized tasks for creating digital media narratives with interactive elements.

8

To be able to conduct a critical analysis of a film or a work of digital media arts from technical, intellectual and artistic points of view.

9

To be able to take individual responsibility of a film or a digital media work from scratch to product in a problem-solving manner.

10

To be able to work as a crewmember by following norms of ethical conduct and taking initiative to improve the ethical standards of his/her working environment.

11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Cinema and Digital Media and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest