GEHU 203 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Modern World History
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEHU 203
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The objective of this course is to introduce essential aspects of the modern world history to improve the general culture of our students. For students of political science in particular, the course facilitates a minimum understanding of modern world history that is necessary in all the other departmental courses.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • to describe the notion of modernity in its economic, social and political dimensions from a historical perspective
  • to understand the most important ideas that lay at the foundation of modern political history
  • to define the role played by the Renaissance and the Reformation in the making of the modern world
  • to explain the revolutions (agricultural, industrial, ideological, technological, political) that marked the modern world history
  • to understand the major negative phenomena, such as colonialism and slavery, imperialism, authoritarianism and totalitarianism and political extremism, that have marked our political modernity
  • to explain the collapse of European empires and the emergence of nation states
  • to analyze the end of communism and the emergence of the post-communist world order, with organisations such as the UN, EU and NATO at the centre of modern global politics
Course Content The course is an introductory one and it is designed to encourage the students to study politics from a historical perspective. The content is built around academic bibliography on modern world history with a focus on political and cultural history. The students are expected to (1) attend all classes, (2) read the assignments, (3) answer instructor’s questions and ask their own questions to the instructor throughout the course, and (4) prepare for the exams as guided by the instructor.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction Explanation of the course syllabus and of the bibliography. WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 1-43. ALL entries in the additional bibliography.
2 Asia and Europe: 1500-1914 WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 1-43. FOUCAULT, Michel, 1995. Discipline and punish: The birth of the prison, translated by Alan Sheridan. New York and Toronto: Vintage Books, pp. 170-177. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
3 Asia and Europe: 1500-1914 WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 1-43. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
4 The Rise of the West and the Impact of Western Man WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 54-80. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
5 “White Peril” in the East; The Expansion of the Russian and American Empires WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 81-135. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
6 “White Peril” in the East; The Expansion of the Russian and American Empires WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 81-135. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
7 Midterm Exam
8 Scientific and Industrial Revolutions WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 136-152. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
9 The Great War and the Birth of Communism as a New World Religion WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 153-182. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY
10 Asia in the Interwar Years WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 183-202.
11 The Second World War; The Cold War and the Balance of Terror WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 203-227. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY
12 Communist Regimes and their Collapse in the USSR and Eastern Europe WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 241-257. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
13 The ‘West’ after the Second World War WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 258-351. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
14 The ‘West’ after the End of the Cold War WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 258-351. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
15 Africa from 1500 to Decolonisation WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 44-53, 228-240. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Power point presentations and other course documents provided by the instructor in electronic format on the course webpage.

Woodruff W 2002, A concise history of the modern world, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke and New York (main course book, available at the IUE library and in electronic PDF format as prepared by the instructor).

Suggested Readings/Materials

(All sources can be found in hard copies in the IUE Library and in electronic format from some internet sources)

FOUCAULT, M 1995. Discipline and punish: The birth of the prison, translated by Alan Sheridan. New York and Toronto: Vintage Books.

GIDDENS, Anthony, 1990. The consequences of modernity. Cambridge: Polity Press.

HOBSBAWM, E 1997. Age of revolution, 1789-1848, London: Phoenix.

HOBSBAWM, E 1975. Age of capital, 1848-1875, London: Phoenix.

HOBSBAWM, E 1997. Age of empire, 1875-1914, London: Phoenix.

HOBSBAWM, E 1995. Age of extremes: a history of the world, 1914-1991, New York: Vintage Books.

MOSES, AD (ed.) 2008. Empire, colony, genocide: conquest, occupation, and subaltern resistance in world history, New York: Berghahn Books.

CROWE, D 1992. The essentials of European history: 1914 to 1935, World War I and Europe in crisis, Piscataway NJ: Research & Education Association.

NORTON, DH 1990. The essentials of European history: 1935 to the 1988, World War II and the iron curtain, Piscataway NJ: Research & Education Association.

KAMRAVA, M 2011. The modern Middle East: a political history since the First World War, Berkeley: University of California Press.

KENNEDY, P 1988. The rise and fall of the great powers: Economic change and military conflict from 1500 to 2000, London: Unwin Hyman.

 

The students are also encouraged to use ANY OTHER source considered relevant for the seminar and exam topics and available in the University library, EBSCO, JSTOR, or other academic data bases.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
40
Final Exam
1
50
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
2
60
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
30
Final Exam
1
35
    Total
155

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to define and discuss the history, underlying concepts and theories of cinema and digital media.

2

To be able to develop a storytelling idea for cinema and digital media arts by using creativity and critical thinking.

3

To be able to operate specialized technical equipment and competently use software in the fields of cinema and digital media arts. 

4

To be able to execute the main tasks in the pre-production, production and post-production of an audio-visual work at the basic level including screenwriting, production planning, operating the camera, sound recording, lighting and editing.

5

To be able to perform a specialized task at an advanced level either for pre-production, production or post-production of an audio-visual work.

6

To be able to discuss how meaning is made through works of cinema and digital media; in what ways economics, politics and culture affect visual representation; how the conditions of production, consumption, distribution and interpretation shape images.

7

To be able to perform specialized tasks for creating digital media narratives with interactive elements.

8

To be able to conduct a critical analysis of a film or a work of digital media arts from technical, intellectual and artistic points of view.

9

To be able to take individual responsibility of a film or a digital media work from scratch to product in a problem-solving manner.

10

To be able to work as a crewmember by following norms of ethical conduct and taking initiative to improve the ethical standards of his/her working environment.

11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Cinema and Digital Media and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest