CDM 470 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Moving Images in a Digital Age
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 470
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This class will examine the changes that occurred in the production and consumption of moving images in the process of digitization. In different weeks, we will focus on various forms of moving images, including Hollywood blockbusters, independent cinema, video installations, and documentaries with an objective to understand how digitization impacts them. We will analyze the cultural effects of novel forms of media, such as popular YouTube videos, which emerged as a result of digitization. We will also assess how digitization transforms audience engagement with moving images.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Understand how digitization changes the production and the audience interaction with moving images
  • Identify the specific effects of digitization on different forms of moving images.
  • Discern the ways in which audiences interact with varieties of digitized moving images and changes that occurred in audience consumption of media texts as a result of digitization.
  • Understand the connections between technological advance and the emergence of novel media forms and alternative media aesthetics.
  • Examine how digital media/motion pictures facilitates the construction of new global communities and global interaction.
  • Discuss how digitization impacts the formation and transformation of socio-cultural identities.
Course Content This course analyzes the transformation of moving images through the process of digitization. We will examine how digitization impacts the production and audience use of motion pictures, as well as focusing on the construction of new socio-cultural identities in the global mediascape through digital moving images.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 The Digital Cinema: Form and Content Grainge, P. (2018). Colouring the past: Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory. In Memory and popular film. Manchester University Press.
2 Postmodern Film Setka, S. (2015). Bastardized History: How Inglourious Basterds Breaks through American Screen Memory. Film & New Media, 3(1), 141-169.
3 Hyperlink Realism Krems, J. A., & Dunbar, R. I. (2013). Clique size and network characteristics in hyperlink cinema. Human Nature, 24(4), 414-429.
4 Digitization and Futurism Virginás, A. (2017). Gendered transmediation of the digital from S1m0ne to Ex Machina:‘visual pleasure’reloaded?. European Journal of English Studies, 21(3), 288-303.
5 Digital Documentaries and Digital Affects Gobel, A. (2019). Towards Affective Listening: Hearing Corporeal Memories in Cameraperson and Stories We Tell. The Ohio State University).
6 Intercultural Dialogues in Global Film Haidar, C. (2011). An Investigation into the Meaning of Locally Produced Entertainment Media to Lebanese Women.
7 Animation Prasch, T. (2008). Persepolis (2007). Film & History: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Film and Television Studies, 38(2), 80-82.
8 Smartphone Feature Films Eriksson, P. E., & Eriksson, Y. (2015). Syncretistic images: iPhone fiction filmmaking and its cognitive ramifications. Digital Creativity, 26(2), 138-153.
9 Genre and Gender in Digital Features Taubin, A. (2019). The Highest Stakes. Film Comment, 55(4), 60-62.
10 Musicals and Digital Imageries Sticchi, F. (2018). Inside the “Mind” of Llewyn Davis: Embodying a Melancholic Vision of the World. Quarterly Review of Film and Video, 35(2), 137-152.
11 Time in New Digital Cinema Harte, T. (2005). A Visit to the Museum: Aleksandr Sokurov's Russian Ark and the Framing of the Eternal. Slavic Review, 64(1), 43-58.
12 Genre Hybridity in the Digital Age Gulam, J. (2019). Breaking out and fighting back: Female resistance in the Trump-era horror film. In Make America Hate Again (pp. 57-66). Routledge.
13 Digital Art Harvey-Davitt, J. (2016). Conflicted selves: the humanist cinema of Nuri Bilge Ceylan. New Review of Film and Television Studies, 14(2), 249-267.
14 Blockbusters in the Digital Age Boulware, T. (2016). " Who Killed the World": Building a Feminist Utopia from the Ashes of Toxic Masculinity in Mad Max: Fury Road. Mise-en-scène| The Journal of Film & Visual Narration, 1(1).
15 Review of the semester
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

The course uses the sources that are listed above in the weekly subjects and related preparations.

Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
3
30
Homework / Assignments
1
50
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
50
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
50
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
3
3
Homework / Assignments
1
25
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
114

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to define and discuss the history, underlying concepts and theories of cinema and digital media.

X
2

To be able to develop a storytelling idea for cinema and digital media arts by using creativity and critical thinking.

X
3

To be able to operate specialized technical equipment and competently use software in the fields of cinema and digital media arts. 

X
4

To be able to execute the main tasks in the pre-production, production and post-production of an audio-visual work at the basic level including screenwriting, production planning, operating the camera, sound recording, lighting and editing.

X
5

To be able to perform a specialized task at an advanced level either for pre-production, production or post-production of an audio-visual work.

X
6

To be able to discuss how meaning is made through works of cinema and digital media; in what ways economics, politics and culture affect visual representation; how the conditions of production, consumption, distribution and interpretation shape images.

X
7

To be able to perform specialized tasks for creating digital media narratives with interactive elements.

X
8

To be able to conduct a critical analysis of a film or a work of digital media arts from technical, intellectual and artistic points of view.

X
9

To be able to take individual responsibility of a film or a digital media work from scratch to product in a problem-solving manner.

X
10

To be able to work as a crewmember by following norms of ethical conduct and taking initiative to improve the ethical standards of his/her working environment.

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Cinema and Digital Media and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest