CDM 350 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Frameworks: Diverse Practices in Cinema
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 350
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives Introduces and familiarizes the student with a wide range of diverse practices in cinema through examples of historical and contemporary artist works.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • explain the mechanisms of diverse practices in the realm of cinema
  • compare the applications of various forms and techniques in cinematic practices and theories
  • discuss the historical, technical and cultural developments leading to such practices
  • identify original and distinctive artistic work and experimental techniques within narrative filmmaking
  • apply various experimental visual and narrative strategies to their own works
Course Content This course aims to familiarize the students with diverse practices in cinema. Examples of avant-garde, experimental and found footage cinema will be screened and its theories and artist practices will be discussed in class.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction- Short film ‘Meshes of the Afternoon’ (1943) by Maya Deren will be screened.
2 Thinking in form I - Audiovisual experiments in narrative films and music videos. Excerpts from the films of A. Tarkovsky, C. Reygadas, P. Grandrieux, X. Dolan, L. Carax, M. Figgis will be screened. Passages from Berger, John. Ways of Seeing (1990, Penguin)
3 Thinking in form II - Experimenting with the narrative, looking for new forms of storytelling. ‘Zayiat’ (2013) by Deniz Tortum will be screened. Excerpts from the films of D. Lynch, M. Haneke, M. Frammartino, J. Rosales will be screened. Passages from Barthes, Roland. Camera Lucida (1982, Hill and Wang)
4 Auto-fiction I - Reconstructing the self in a fictional world. In what ways directors include themselves in their films. Excerpts from the films of N.B. Ceylan, W. Allen, Kim Ki Duk, J. Panahi, N. Moretti, A. Varda will be screened. Meg Jensen “How Art Constitutes the Human: Aesthetics, Empathy and the Interesting in Autofiction” in Dix, Hywel. Autofiction in English (2018, Springer International)
5 Auto-fiction II - Allegory of the self. In what ways imaginary worlds can collide with directors’ own reality. Genco - Ali Kemal Çınar will be screened. Passages from Hywel Dix, Autofiction in English (2018, Springer International)
6 Essayist approach - Narration and monologue. Visual and narrative strategies of contemporary essayist filmmaking. Excerpts from the films of J-L. Godard, C. Marker, G. Debord will be screened. Timothy Corrigan “Essayism and Contemporary Film Narrative” in Papazian, Elizabeth; Eades, Caroline. The Essay Film: Dialogue, Politics, Utopia (2016, Wallflower Press)
7 Spatial cinema - How to tell the story of places? Excerpts from the films of G. Rosi, F. Wiseman, and D. Tortum will be screened. Choose your subject of homework and final project.
8 Documentary in action I - Recording the perishable. Creative approaches and visual strategies in documentary filmmaking. Excerpts from the films of D. Vertov, J. Oppenheimer, A. Weerasethakul, M. Glawogger and W. Herzog will be screened. Wilma de Jong; Erik Knudsen; Jerry Rothwell. “Life does not tell stories: structuring devices in documentary filmmaking” in Creative Documentary - Theory and Practice (2013, Routledge)
9 Documentary in action II - Resistance of the image. Creative approaches and contemporary narrative strategies in documentary filmmaking. Distant Constellation - Shevaun Mizrahi will be screened. Excerpts from the films of P. Costa will be screened. Passages from Sontag, Susan. Regarding The Pain of Others (2004, Penguin)
10 Talking heads I - Truth or words. Creative methods of using interviews. Excerpts from the films of J. Rouch, L. Malle, K. Kieslowski will be screened. Therese Davis “Reading the Face” in The Face on the Screen - Death, Recognition and Spectatorship (2004, Intellect Books)
11 Talking heads II - Fiction or words. Using interviews in fictional narrative cinema. 9 - Umit Unal will be screened. Excerpts from the films of A. Kiarostami, A. Yılmaz will also be screened. Passages from The Face on the Screen - Death, Recognition and Spectatorship (2004, Intellect Books)
12 Queer forms for queer narratives - Excerpts from the films of E Williams, D. Jarman will be screened. B. Ruby Rich “New Queer Cinema” Village Voice, 1992
13 Found footage and the power of the archive - Excerpts from the films of M. Arnold, J. M. Salles, S. de Sousa Dias will be screened.
14 Screening of students’ projects.
15 Review of the semester
16 Review of the final projects

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials 1)Wees, William. Light Moving in Time 2) Taylor, Richard and Christie, Ian. Russian and Soviet Cinema in Documents 1896-1939 3) Essential Brakhage edited by McPherson, Bruce R., Documentext 2001 3)UBU Sound and Film Archive: http://www.ubu.com 2)The Early Video Project: http://davidsonsfiles.org/ 3)Radical Software Magazine, 19701974. Web Archive: http://www.radicalsoftware.org/ 4) The Internet Archive: http://www.archive.org 5) http://www.hi-beam.net/cgi-bin/flicker.pl

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
30
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
50
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
10
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
110

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to define and discuss the history, underlying concepts and theories of cinema and digital media.

X
2

To be able to develop a storytelling idea for cinema and digital media arts by using creativity and critical thinking.

X
3

To be able to operate specialized technical equipment and competently use software in the fields of cinema and digital media arts. 

X
4

To be able to execute the main tasks in the pre-production, production and post-production of an audio-visual work at the basic level including screenwriting, production planning, operating the camera, sound recording, lighting and editing.

X
5

To be able to perform a specialized task at an advanced level either for pre-production, production or post-production of an audio-visual work.

X
6

To be able to discuss how meaning is made through works of cinema and digital media; in what ways economics, politics and culture affect visual representation; how the conditions of production, consumption, distribution and interpretation shape images.

X
7

To be able to perform specialized tasks for creating digital media narratives with interactive elements.

X
8

To be able to conduct a critical analysis of a film or a work of digital media arts from technical, intellectual and artistic points of view.

X
9

To be able to take individual responsibility of a film or a digital media work from scratch to product in a problem-solving manner.

X
10

To be able to work as a crewmember by following norms of ethical conduct and taking initiative to improve the ethical standards of his/her working environment.

11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Cinema and Digital Media and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest