CDM 312 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Film Seminar: A Cinema in the Shade IV
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 312
Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce students to films that have an important place in film history and yet have low visibility in the framework of commercial cinema, and to enable the students to acquire film culture.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Define experimental and creative works of cinema, video and new media arts.
  • Identify the diversity of cinema
  • Discuss films in relation to the institutions and cultures that produced them
  • Compare films in the context of their socio-cultural milieu
  • Analyze films as part of cinematic traditions of narrative, technique, and also as products of authorial styles
Course Content This is the fourth installment of a series of courses, mainly consisting of introducing and screening films which are crucial to forming film culture and not readily available elsewhere. The films are selected among the canons, as well as the experimental and avant-garde (commercial or non-commercial), even trash and camp This installment of the film seminar has two major focuses: the connection between cinema and the body, and the effects of technology on cinema.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Virtuality Screening: Cam (Daniel Goldhaber, 2018) Gilles Deleuze, The Actual and the Virtual, Dialogues, (1987), 148-152
3 Embodiment I Screening: Antiviral (Brandon Cronenberg, 2012) Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, Desiring Machines, Anti-Oedipus, (1972), 1-50.
4 Embodiment II Screening: Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982) Donna Harraway, Cyborg Manifesto, Simians, Cyborgs, and Women (1984, New York: Routledge), 149-183.
5 Embodiment III Screening: Ghost in the Shell (Mamoru Oshii, 1995) Alan Turing, Computer Machinery and Intelligence, Mind, Vol. 59, No: 236 (Oct, 1950), 433-460
6 Perverse Computing – UI Screening: Her (Spike Jonze, 2013) First essay due date Kristina Andersen and Joanna Berzowska, Worn Technology-Alteration of Social Space, Hybrid Space, Open! Platform for art Culture and Public Domain (November, 2006) www.onlineopen.org/download.php?id=284
7 Midterm
8 Transmedia Storytelling Screening: Timecode (Mike Figgis, 2000) Andrea Phillips, A Creator’s Guide to Transmedia Storytelling, (2012), 55-69.
9 Simulacra and Simulation Screening: : Philip K Dick’s Electric Dreams: Real Life (Jeffrey Reiner, 2018) Black Mirror: Fifteen Million Merits (Euros Lyn, 2011) Jean Baudrillard, Simulacra and Simulation, (1981), 1-28.
10 Hybrid-Spaces – Immersion Screening: eXistenz (David Cronenberg, 1999) Eric Kluitenberg, The Network of Waves, Open, No:11 (2006), 6-16.
11 Mass Media Screening: Videodrome (David Cronenberg, 1983) Mary Flanagan, Mobile Identities, Digital Stars and Post-Cinematic Selves, Wide Angle, Vol.21 No:1 (January, 1999), 77-93.
12 Found Footage and Viral Marketing Screening: Megan is Missing (Michael Goi, 2011) Alexandra Heller-Nicholas, Found Footage Horror Films, (2014), 58-86
13 Web 2.0 Screening: Unfriended (Leo Gabriadze, 2014) Tim O’Reilly, What is Web 2.0, Web Squared: Web 2.0 Five Years On (Oct, 2009), http://www.oreilly.com/pub/a//web2/archive/what-is-web-20.html
14 Online Communities – Augmented Reality Screening: Nerve (Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman, 2016) Jason Farman, Mobile Interface Theory, Chp. 4 (2011), 76-94.
15 Final
16 Review of the semester

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
50
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
50
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
2
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
1
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
28
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
26
Final Exam
    Total
118

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to define and discuss the history, underlying concepts and theories of cinema and digital media.

X
2

To be able to develop a storytelling idea for cinema and digital media arts by using creativity and critical thinking.

X
3

To be able to operate specialized technical equipment and competently use software in the fields of cinema and digital media arts. 

4

To be able to execute the main tasks in the pre-production, production and post-production of an audio-visual work at the basic level including screenwriting, production planning, operating the camera, sound recording, lighting and editing.

5

To be able to perform a specialized task at an advanced level either for pre-production, production or post-production of an audio-visual work.

6

To be able to discuss how meaning is made through works of cinema and digital media; in what ways economics, politics and culture affect visual representation; how the conditions of production, consumption, distribution and interpretation shape images.

X
7

To be able to perform specialized tasks for creating digital media narratives with interactive elements.

8

To be able to conduct a critical analysis of a film or a work of digital media arts from technical, intellectual and artistic points of view.

X
9

To be able to take individual responsibility of a film or a digital media work from scratch to product in a problem-solving manner.

10

To be able to work as a crewmember by following norms of ethical conduct and taking initiative to improve the ethical standards of his/her working environment.

11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Cinema and Digital Media and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest