CDM 310 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Horror Film
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 310
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce students to the immense field of horror film studies.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Identify the key concepts of horror film theory.
  • Describe basic horror sub-genres.
  • Analyze the representations of gender in horror films.
  • Compare significant approaches in the history of horror cinema from classical to contemporary.
  • Argue within the context of cinematic gaze.
Course Content This course combines theoretical work and film analysis. There will be in-class and off-class screenings. Horror film theory will be used to discuss questions of gender and politics in cinema. Students will be expected to write three response papers.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Representation and the Gaze Screening: Vampyr (1931) Dracula (1931) Alison Peirse, “The Impossibility of Vision: Vampirism, Formlessness and Horror in Vampyr” in Studies in European Cinema Vol. 5 No. 3 (2009), 161-170. Robin Wood, “Burying the Undead: The Use and Obsolescene of Count Dracula” in The Dread of Difference: Gender and Horror Film ed. Barry Keith Grant (1983, Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 2015), 388-402.
3 Repressed Desire Screening: Bride of Frankenstein (1936) Cat People (1942) Mary Jacobus, “Is There a Woman in This Text?” in New Literary History Vol. 14 No.1 (Autumn, 1982), 117-141. Elizabeth Young, “Here Comes the Bride: Wedding Gender and Race in Bride of Frankenstein” in The Dread of Difference, 2nd edition, ed. Barry Keith Grant (1991/2015, Austin, TX: University of Texas Press), 359-387. Karen Hollinger, “The Monster as Woman: Two Generations of Cat People” in The Dread of Difference, 2nd edition, ed. Barry Keith Grant (1991/2015, Austin, TX: University of Texas Press), 346-358.
4 Zombie Politics Screening: The Night of the Living Dead (1968) Barry Keith Grant, “Taking Back the Night of the Living Dead” in The Dread of Difference, 2nd edition, ed. Barry Keith Grant (1981/2015, Austin, TX: University of Texas Press), 228-240. Kerstin Oloff, “From Sugar to Oil: The Ecology of George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead” in Journal of Postcolonial Writing Vol. 53 No.3 (2017), 316-328.
5 Vampires and Exploitation Screening: The Blood Spattered Bride (1972) Bonnie Zimmermann, “Daughters of Darkness” in The Dread of Difference, 2nd edition, ed. Barry Keith Grant (1981/2015, Austin, TX: University of Texas Press), 430-438. Barbara Creed, Monstrous Feminine (2007, New York, NY: Routledge) 59-72.
6 The Eye and the Spectator: Giallo Screening: Opera (1987) Zombie 2 (1979) First Response Paper Due Date Donald L. Anderson, “Georges Bataille: The Globular & Cross Gender Identification Through Eyeball Mutilation In The Horror Film” in Rhizomes No. 7 (Fall, 2003), http://www.rhizomes.net/issue7/anderson.htm Leon Hunt, “A (Sadistic) Night at the Opera” in The Horror Reader, ed. Ken Gelder (2000, London: Routledge), 324-335. Adam Knee, “Genre, Gender, Argento” in The Dread of Difference, 2nd edition, ed. Barry Keith Grant (1981/2015, Austin, TX: University of Texas Press), 430-438.
7 Revenge Screening: I Spit On Your Grave (1978-2010) Laura Mee, “Revenge of Jeniffer Hills: Gender and genre in I Spit On Your Grave (2010)” in Horror Studies Vol. 4 No. 1 (2013), 75-89. Barbara Creed, Monstrous Feminine (2007, New York, NY: Routledge), 122-138.
8 Re-Gendering the Final Girl Screening: Sleepaway Camp (1983) Carol Clover, “Her Body, Himself: Gender in the Slasher Film” in The Dread of Difference, 2nd edition, ed. Barry Keith Grant (1981/2015, Austin, TX: University of Texas Press), 68-115.
9 Adolescence and Menstruation Screening: Ginger Snaps (2000) Martin Barker, “Menstrual Monsters: The Reception of the Ginger Snaps Cult Horror Franchise” in Film International Vol.4 No.21 (2006), 68-77.
10 New French Extremity Screening: Martyrs (2008) Second Response Paper Due Date Christopher Butler, “Spectatorial Shock and Carnal Consumption: (Re)envisaging Historical Trauma in New French Extremity” University of South Florida Graduate Dissertation, Scholar Commons (January, 2013), 48-68.
11 Exorcism and Conservatism Screening: The Conjuring (2013) Barbara Creed, Monstrous Feminine (2007, New York, NY: Routledge), 31-42. Douglas Kellner, “Poltergeist: Suburban Ideology” in Jump Cut No.28 (April, 1983), 5-6.
12 Horror After 9/11 Screening: Hostel (2005) Hostel: Part II (2007) Christopher Sharett, “Conservatism of Contemporary Horror Films” in Cineaste Vol.35 No.1 (Winter, 2009), 32-27. Adam Lowenstein, “Spectacle Horror and Hostel” Critical Quarterly Vol. 53 No.1 (2011), 42-60.
13 Mutation and Kawaii Horror Screening: Vampire Girl vs. Frankenstein Girl (2009) Jay McRoy, Nighmare Japan Contemporary Japanese Horror Cinema (2008, New York, NY: Rodopi), 116-146.
14 Remake and Reboot Screening: Suspiria (2018) Sigmund Freud, The Uncanny, (1919) E.T.A Hoffmann, The Sandman (2016, London: Penguin Books)
15 Third Response Paper Due Date
16 Review of the semester

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
25
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
3
75
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
3
17
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
131

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1 To develop the habit of critical thinking in areas of cinema and digital media. X
2 To be able to comprehend and discuss theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of cinema and digital media. X
3 To know and understand practices in areas of cinema and digital media as creative and/or business processes. To be able to see these processes from cultural and historical perspectives.
4 To cultivate awareness in the inter- and multi-disciplinary nature of cinema and digital media, thus developing a dynamic and flexible professional character capable of operating and communicating across a wide range of subject areas. X
5 To develop an understanding of the unity of theory of practice and practice of theory. X
6 To observe norms of work ethic and a thoroughgoing professional ethic.
7 Endowed with the virtues and skills of being self-disciplined, self-critical and self-managerial, to be able to both work independently and as member of a team. X
8 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programmes in the areas of cinema and digital media and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of cinema and digital media, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale”, Level B1). X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process aimed at the achievement personal and social goals

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest