CDM 203 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Creative Writing
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 203
Fall
2
2
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce students to the fundamentals of creative writing and storytelling.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • describe fundamentals of storytelling.
  • argue creatively on narration.
  • write stories that convey ideas and emotions
  • analyze fiction writing.
  • Discuss fiction narratives.
  • Identify the structures in existing fictional pieces.
Course Content The course combines theories of creative writing with applied methods of storytelling. Students will be required to creatively read, write, revise and develop stories. There will be 3 quizes, 5 assignments and a project.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 “The Story” and its structure. The Craft of Storytelling. MCKEE: Chapter I
2 Creativity and Idea. (Theme and Logline.) Writing Fundamentals: Statement, Sentence, Paragraph. MILLER: Theme LE GUIN: Chapter 1, 3
3 Hero, Protagonist&Antagonist. Introduction to Conflict. Writing Fundamentals: Voice&narrator VOGLER: Chapter I: HERO Selected Fiction Piece
4 The Character. EGRI: Chapter 2: CHARACTER
5 Introduction to Writer’s Toolkit: Expectation, Empathy, Dilemma&Conflict EGRI: Chapter 3: Conflict
6 Writing Fundamentals: Layered Narration, flow, rhythm and emotion. Selected Fiction Piece LE GUIN: Chapter 7
7 Story World Bulding(Mood) VOGLER: Chapter 2: Ordinary World
8 Archetypes&Mythology VOGLER: Archetypes
9 Writing Fundamentals: Dialogue. Selected Fiction Piece
10 Story&Character Arcs WEILAND (p. 1-22)
11 Introduction to Archplot: 3 act and Journey VOGLER: Chapter 1 (p. 41-65)
12 Full Film Analysis Selected Fiction Piece
13 Introduction to Scene1: Key Concepts MILLER: Scene and Sequence (p. 137-150) MCKEE: Scene Design.
14 Introduction to Scene 2 MILLER: Scene and Sequence (p. 150-165)
15 Review of the semester
16 Review of the semester

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

MILLER, William C. Screenwriting for Film and Television.

MCKEE, R. Story: Style, Structure, Substance, and the Principles of Screenwriting.

EGRI, L. Art Of Dramatic Writing: Its Basis in the Creative Interpretation of Human Motives.

VOGLER, C. Writer's Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers.

WEILAND K.M. Creating Character Arcs: The Masterful Author’s Guide to Uniting Story Structure.

LE GUIN URSULA K. Steering the Craft

ARISTOTLE. Poetics.

FIELD, S. Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting: A Step-by-Step Guide from Concept to finished Script.

TRUBY, J. The Anatomy of Story: 22 Steps to Becoming a Master Storyteller.

JUNG, C.G. The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious.

CAMPBELL J. Hero with a Thousand Faces.

HUNTER, L. Lew Hunter’s Screenwriting 434: The Industries Top Teacher Reveals the secrets of the Successful Screenplay.

GULINO P. Joseph&SHEARS Connie: The Science of Screenwriting.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
3
15
Homework / Assignments
5
40
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
35
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
8
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
4
64
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
3
2
Homework / Assignments
5
3
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
15
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
148

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to define and discuss the history, underlying concepts and theories of cinema and digital media.

X
2

To be able to develop a storytelling idea for cinema and digital media arts by using creativity and critical thinking.

X
3

To be able to operate specialized technical equipment and competently use software in the fields of cinema and digital media arts. 

4

To be able to execute the main tasks in the pre-production, production and post-production of an audio-visual work at the basic level including screenwriting, production planning, operating the camera, sound recording, lighting and editing.

X
5

To be able to perform a specialized task at an advanced level either for pre-production, production or post-production of an audio-visual work.

X
6

To be able to discuss how meaning is made through works of cinema and digital media; in what ways economics, politics and culture affect visual representation; how the conditions of production, consumption, distribution and interpretation shape images.

X
7

To be able to perform specialized tasks for creating digital media narratives with interactive elements.

X
8

To be able to conduct a critical analysis of a film or a work of digital media arts from technical, intellectual and artistic points of view.

X
9

To be able to take individual responsibility of a film or a digital media work from scratch to product in a problem-solving manner.

X
10

To be able to work as a crewmember by following norms of ethical conduct and taking initiative to improve the ethical standards of his/her working environment.

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Cinema and Digital Media and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest