CDM 102 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Images, Sounds, Cultures II
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 102
Spring
2
2
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course complements CDM 101 by exploring the postmodern world of images. It aims to change the way students look at the visual world that surrounds them. It will help students to develop an understanding of the ways in which meaning is produced in visual culture. The course will center on the following questions: How do we make meaning of the audio-visual world? In what ways do economics, politics, culture affect visual representation? How do the ways in which visual culture is produced, consumed, distributed, and interpreted, play into the images we encounter every day? What is the relationship between images and power?
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • define contemporary visual culture
  • explain how viewers make meaning of images
  • argue with the basic concepts of visual culture
  • analyze images in their economic, social, political and cultural contexts
  • apply methods of visual cultural analysis to images
  • identify how images circulate through the social field
  • discuss the politics of visual representation
Course Content The course reviews images ranging from newspapers to the Web, advertisements to the movies, from television to fine arts and discusses cultural products in their economic, social, political and cultural contexts. The course will be held in interactive lecture form. Students are expected to participate in class discussion. There will be in-class screening of videos related to the topics covered. Evaluation will be based on several take-home assignments and a final project.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction Basic concepts
2 From Modernism to Postmodernism – Changing Regimes of Visuality I Marita Sturken & Lisa Cartwright “Chapter 8: Postmodernism, Indie Media, and Popular Culture” in Practices of Looking. An Introduction to Visual Culture, Oxford University Press. 2009, pp. 307-328.
3 From Modernism to Postmodernism – Changing Regimes of Visuality II: Simulacrum Screening: Český Sen (2004) (90 min) Sturken & Cartwright “Chapter 8: Postmodernism, Indie Media, and Popular Culture” in Practices of Looking. An Introduction to Visual Culture, Oxford University Press. 2009, pp. 328-345. Jean Baudrillard, Simulacra and Simulation, pp. 3-6.
4 The Spectacle: Shock & Awe Screening: The Persuaders (PBS) http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/persuaders/ SUBMIT ASSIGNMENT 1 (SIMULATION) Zeynep Gürsel, “Spectacular Terrorism. Images on the Frontline of History” 9/11 New York – Istanbul (Ed. Feride Çiçekoğlu), pp. 154-191. Guy Debord, The Society of the Spectacle, 1967. Jean Baudrillard, The Gulf War did not take place. 1995.
5 Culture Jamming Marilyn Bordwell, “Jamming Culture: Adbusters' Hip Media Campaign Against Consumerism” in Princen, Thomas, Michael Maniates, and Ken Conca (Eds) Confronting consumption. MIT Press. 2002, pp. 237-254.
6 Virtual Reality, Digital Cultures Screening: Digital Nation (PBS) http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/digitalnation/ SUBMIT ASSIGNMENT 2 (CULTURE JAMMING) Nicholas Mirzoef “Virtuality: From virtual antiquity to the pixel zone” in An Introduction to Visual Culture. Routledge, 1999. pp. 91-125.
7 The Cool Screening Merchants of Cool (PBS) http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/cool/view/ Dick Pountain and David Robins. Cool Rules. The Anatomy of an Attitude. Reaktion Books. 2000, pp. 15-33. Robert Farris Thompson “An Aesthetic of the Cool” African Arts. 1973. Vol 7(1), pp. 40-43, 64-67, 89-91.
8 Global Circulation of Images I SUBMIT ASSIGNMENT 3 (THE COOL) Sturken & Cartwright, “Chapter 10: The global flow of visual culture”, in Practices of Looking. An Introduction to Visual Culture, Oxford University Press. 2009, pp. 389-406.
9 From Nationalism to Globalism William Mazzarella "'Very Bombay': Contending with the Global in an Indian Advertising Agency." Cultural Anthropology 18, no. 1 (2003): 33–71. Derya Ozkan & Robert J. Foster “Consumer Citizenship, Nationalism, and Neoliberal Globalization in Turkey: The Advertising Launch of Cola Turka” Advertising & Society Review, vol. 6 no. 3, 2005.
10 Global Circulation of Images II SUBMIT ASSIGNMENT 4 (GLOBALIZATION) Sturken & Cartwright, “Chapter 10: The global flow of visual culture”, in Practices of Looking. An Introduction to Visual Culture, Oxford University Press. 2009, pp. 407-430. Mirzoeff, “Diana’s Death: Gender, Photography and the Inauguration of Global Visual Culture” in An Introduction to Visual Culture. Routledge, 1999. pp. 231-247.
11 Social Media & the Internet Screening Growing up Online (PBS) http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/kidsonline/ Generation Like (PBS)http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/generation-like/ Susan Murray (2008) “Digital Images, Photo-sharing, and our shifting notions of everyday aesthetics” Journal of Visual Culture. Vol 7(2), pp. 147-163.
12 Student Presentations
13 Student Presentations
14 Review of the Semester
15 Review of the Semester
16 Final Project Submission

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

 

 

Suggested Readings/Materials

Marita Sturken & Lisa Cartwright. 2009. Practices of looking: an introduction to visual culture. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
4
40
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
7
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
4
64
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
4
6
Presentation / Jury
1
6
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
162

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1 To develop the habit of critical thinking in areas of cinema and digital media. X
2 To be able to comprehend and discuss theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of cinema and digital media. X
3 To know and understand practices in areas of cinema and digital media as creative and/or business processes. To be able to see these processes from cultural and historical perspectives. X
4 To cultivate awareness in the inter- and multi-disciplinary nature of cinema and digital media, thus developing a dynamic and flexible professional character capable of operating and communicating across a wide range of subject areas. X
5 To develop an understanding of the unity of theory of practice and practice of theory. X
6 To observe norms of work ethic and a thoroughgoing professional ethic. X
7 Endowed with the virtues and skills of being self-disciplined, self-critical and self-managerial, to be able to both work independently and as member of a team. X
8 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programmes in the areas of cinema and digital media and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of cinema and digital media, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale”, Level B1). X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process aimed at the achievement personal and social goals X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest