CDM 370 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Advanced Creative Writing
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 370
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
  CDM 203 To succeed (To get a grade of at least DD)
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course introduces students who have succeeded Creative Writing to complex techniques of storytelling & creating multilevel, in-depth storylines for writing stories, scripts & games
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • apply multi flow story, complex and organic character development, time loop, multi-axis storytelling, theme choice techniques to writing,
  • use authoring (Scrivener), word processing (Word) & online storyboarding applications in the fields of creative writing (novel, story, movie, television film, TV series, video games etc.),
  • write advanced level stories using individual writing and group writing techniques,
  • manage their time, work flows, develop business ideas, meet project deadlines in writing assignments,
  • apply writing knowledge and technique in conventional and digital channels.
Course Content This course introduces students to industry-grade storytelling & advanced creative writing methods & equips them with skills needed to adapt to real life authoring jobs in the field of their choice.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Hop On the Stagecoach: “A man named John Ford.” Extreme long shot of storytelling & writing techniques – The mechanics of building meaning & emotion SCREENING – Intro sequence – Intro “Stagecoach” John Ford, 1939, United Artists
2 Uncharted: “Entering an unknown territory that is you.” Choosing & writing from personal experience – The good, the bad & the ugly parts of it READING – Chapter 1 “On Writing” Stephen King, 2000, Scribner
3 Hero with a Thousand Faces: “Writer as an element of production.” Knowing your role in your story & its life HANDOUT – Hero’s Journey “The Hero with a Thousand Faces” Joseph Campbell, 1949, Pantheon
4 Fabric of Space-Time: “Knowing your boundaries & breaking them.” Writing for production based mediums AKA how to squeeze your imagination into real life PRESENTATION – Anecdotes “The Name of the Rose” Umberto Eco, 1983, Harcourt
5 Being There: “Kosinski, Chance & Sellers” Engineering a complex character & being honest about it – A tradition from Oedipus to Delicious & Wrestler SCREENING – Sequences from movies “Being There” Hal Ashby, 1979, United Artists “Sympathy for Delicious“ Mark Ruffalo, 2010, Independent “Wrestler” Darren Aronofsky, 2008, Wild Bunch
6 A Giant Dwarf: “Equipping goggles of Toulouse – Lautrec.” Choosing a medium & genre for your story – The nature of written motion ARTWORK PRESENTATION
7 A Stolen Bicycle: “Powerful themes & their impact.” Creating a simle theme & developing it into a thematic story avoiding overcomplexity – Why do we keep crying at classics? SCREENING – Sequences from movie "Bicycle Thieves” Vittorio de Sica, 1948, Produzioni de Sica
8 The Da Vinci Code: “Ambidextrous plotting.” Creating single & multiple plots & weaving them together SCRIPT PRESENTATION “The Usual Suspects” Bryan Singer, 1995, Bad Hat Harry Productions
9 The Heming-way: “Letting your loved ones go.” Writing to the point – Editing & editing until you can edit no more & editing a bit more. SCREENING – Intro sequence – Intro “Watchmen” Zack Synder, 2009, Legendary Pictures / DC Comics
10 Drama Toolbox: “Action, dialogue, description, metaphor, simile & other tools.” Choosing a style, creating atmosphere & mood and telling your story according to your choices. READING – Part 2 – Elements of Story OKUMA “Story: Style, Structure, Substance, and the Principles of Screenwriting” Robert McKee, 1997, Harper Collins
11 Pharoah’s Curse: “Story blocks & moving them around.” Executing a story. Project Idea Presentations. READING – Sequences & real life examples from “Tanrının Saati” Meriç Eryürek, 2014, Epsilon “Tarumarname” Meriç Eryürek, 2012, Epsilon
12 A Novel vs. A Movie: “Herman Melville’s ‘Moby Dick’ on paper & on big screen.” Dynamics of writing a novel & a movie. SCREENING & READING “Call me Ishmael – Intro” “Moby Dick” Herman Melville, 1851, Richard Bentley “Moby Dick” John Houston, 1956, United Artists
13 A Movie vs. A Game: “Chuck Palahniuk’s ‘Fight Club’ as a movie & a video game.” Dynamics of writing a novel, a movie & a game. SCREENING & SHOWCASE (Sequences) “Fight Club” David Fincher, 1999, Fox 2000 Pictures “Fight Club” 2004, Genuine Games
14 A Movie vs. A TV Series: “Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho & Bates Motel series. Differences between writing for a movie & writing for TV. SCREENING – Sequences “ Psycho” Alfred Hitchcock, 1960, Paramount Pictures “Bates Motel” 2015, NBC
15 Hop off The Stagecoach: Extreme close-up shot & review of the year.
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

BOOK “Tanrının Saati”

Meriç Eryürek, 2014, Epsilon

BOOK “Tarumarname”

Meriç Eryürek, 2012, Epsilon

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
1
20
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
10
Presentation / Jury
3
20
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
7
100
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
10
1
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
15
Presentation / Jury
3
10
Project
1
25
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
128

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1 To develop the habit of critical thinking in areas of cinema and digital media. X
2 To be able to comprehend and discuss theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of cinema and digital media. X
3 To know and understand practices in areas of cinema and digital media as creative and/or business processes. To be able to see these processes from cultural and historical perspectives. X
4 To cultivate awareness in the inter- and multi-disciplinary nature of cinema and digital media, thus developing a dynamic and flexible professional character capable of operating and communicating across a wide range of subject areas. X
5 To develop an understanding of the unity of theory of practice and practice of theory. X
6 To observe norms of work ethic and a thoroughgoing professional ethic. X
7 Endowed with the virtues and skills of being self-disciplined, self-critical and self-managerial, to be able to both work independently and as member of a team. X
8 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programmes in the areas of cinema and digital media and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of cinema and digital media, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale”, Level B1). X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level. X
11 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process aimed at the achievement personal and social goals X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest