CDM 370 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Advanced Creative Writing
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 370
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
  CDM 203 To succeed (To get a grade of at least DD)
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course introduces students who have succeeded Creative Writing to complex techniques of storytelling & creating multilevel, in-depth storylines for writing stories, scripts & games
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • apply multi flow story, complex and organic character development, time loop, multi-axis storytelling, theme choice techniques to writing,
  • use authoring (Scrivener), word processing (Word) & online storyboarding applications in the fields of creative writing (novel, story, movie, television film, TV series, video games etc.),
  • write advanced level stories using individual writing and group writing techniques,
  • manage their time, work flows, develop business ideas, meet project deadlines in writing assignments,
  • apply writing knowledge and technique in conventional and digital channels.
Course Content This course introduces students to industry-grade storytelling & advanced creative writing methods & equips them with skills needed to adapt to real life authoring jobs in the field of their choice.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Hop On the Stagecoach: “A man named John Ford.” Extreme long shot of storytelling & writing techniques – The mechanics of building meaning & emotion SCREENING – Intro sequence – Intro “Stagecoach” John Ford, 1939, United Artists
2 Uncharted: “Entering an unknown territory that is you.” Choosing & writing from personal experience – The good, the bad & the ugly parts of it READING – Chapter 1 “On Writing” Stephen King, 2000, Scribner
3 Hero with a Thousand Faces: “Writer as an element of production.” Knowing your role in your story & its life HANDOUT – Hero’s Journey “The Hero with a Thousand Faces” Joseph Campbell, 1949, Pantheon
4 Fabric of Space-Time: “Knowing your boundaries & breaking them.” Writing for production based mediums AKA how to squeeze your imagination into real life PRESENTATION – Anecdotes “The Name of the Rose” Umberto Eco, 1983, Harcourt
5 Being There: “Kosinski, Chance & Sellers” Engineering a complex character & being honest about it – A tradition from Oedipus to Delicious & Wrestler SCREENING – Sequences from movies “Being There” Hal Ashby, 1979, United Artists “Sympathy for Delicious“ Mark Ruffalo, 2010, Independent “Wrestler” Darren Aronofsky, 2008, Wild Bunch
6 A Giant Dwarf: “Equipping goggles of Toulouse – Lautrec.” Choosing a medium & genre for your story – The nature of written motion ARTWORK PRESENTATION
7 A Stolen Bicycle: “Powerful themes & their impact.” Creating a simle theme & developing it into a thematic story avoiding overcomplexity – Why do we keep crying at classics? SCREENING – Sequences from movie "Bicycle Thieves” Vittorio de Sica, 1948, Produzioni de Sica
8 The Da Vinci Code: “Ambidextrous plotting.” Creating single & multiple plots & weaving them together SCRIPT PRESENTATION “The Usual Suspects” Bryan Singer, 1995, Bad Hat Harry Productions
9 The Heming-way: “Letting your loved ones go.” Writing to the point – Editing & editing until you can edit no more & editing a bit more. SCREENING – Intro sequence – Intro “Watchmen” Zack Synder, 2009, Legendary Pictures / DC Comics
10 Drama Toolbox: “Action, dialogue, description, metaphor, simile & other tools.” Choosing a style, creating atmosphere & mood and telling your story according to your choices. READING – Part 2 – Elements of Story OKUMA “Story: Style, Structure, Substance, and the Principles of Screenwriting” Robert McKee, 1997, Harper Collins
11 Pharoah’s Curse: “Story blocks & moving them around.” Executing a story. Project Idea Presentations. READING – Sequences & real life examples from “Tanrının Saati” Meriç Eryürek, 2014, Epsilon “Tarumarname” Meriç Eryürek, 2012, Epsilon
12 A Novel vs. A Movie: “Herman Melville’s ‘Moby Dick’ on paper & on big screen.” Dynamics of writing a novel & a movie. SCREENING & READING “Call me Ishmael – Intro” “Moby Dick” Herman Melville, 1851, Richard Bentley “Moby Dick” John Houston, 1956, United Artists
13 A Movie vs. A Game: “Chuck Palahniuk’s ‘Fight Club’ as a movie & a video game.” Dynamics of writing a novel, a movie & a game. SCREENING & SHOWCASE (Sequences) “Fight Club” David Fincher, 1999, Fox 2000 Pictures “Fight Club” 2004, Genuine Games
14 A Movie vs. A TV Series: “Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho & Bates Motel series. Differences between writing for a movie & writing for TV. SCREENING – Sequences “ Psycho” Alfred Hitchcock, 1960, Paramount Pictures “Bates Motel” 2015, NBC
15 Hop off The Stagecoach: Extreme close-up shot & review of the year.
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

BOOK “Tanrının Saati”

Meriç Eryürek, 2014, Epsilon

BOOK “Tarumarname”

Meriç Eryürek, 2012, Epsilon

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
1
20
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
10
Presentation / Jury
3
20
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
7
100
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
10
1
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
15
Presentation / Jury
3
10
Project
1
25
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exam
    Total
128

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to define and discuss the history, underlying concepts and theories of cinema and digital media.

X
2

To be able to develop a storytelling idea for cinema and digital media arts by using creativity and critical thinking.

X
3

To be able to operate specialized technical equipment and competently use software in the fields of cinema and digital media arts. 

X
4

To be able to execute the main tasks in the pre-production, production and post-production of an audio-visual work at the basic level including screenwriting, production planning, operating the camera, sound recording, lighting and editing.

X
5

To be able to perform a specialized task at an advanced level either for pre-production, production or post-production of an audio-visual work.

X
6

To be able to discuss how meaning is made through works of cinema and digital media; in what ways economics, politics and culture affect visual representation; how the conditions of production, consumption, distribution and interpretation shape images.

X
7

To be able to perform specialized tasks for creating digital media narratives with interactive elements.

X
8

To be able to conduct a critical analysis of a film or a work of digital media arts from technical, intellectual and artistic points of view.

X
9

To be able to take individual responsibility of a film or a digital media work from scratch to product in a problem-solving manner.

X
10

To be able to work as a crewmember by following norms of ethical conduct and taking initiative to improve the ethical standards of his/her working environment.

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Cinema and Digital Media and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest