CDM 360 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Cinematography, Mise-en-scène, and Directing
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 360
Fall/Spring
2
2
3
5

Prerequisites
  CDM 201 To succeed (To get a grade of at least DD)
and CDM 202 To succeed (To get a grade of at least DD)
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course is designed for teaching the stylistic and aesthetic tools of film language through practice. Following the professional production modes and workflows, students will develop skills on the components of cinematic storytelling such as cinematography, staging, directing, and mise-en-scène.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • articulate the role of stylistic and aesthetic features of film language.
  • utilize different tools of film language in cinematic storytelling.
  • define the main phases of filmmaking from pre-production to post-production.
  • •describe major roles and their responsibilities in film production.
  • work as part of a filmmaking team with both creative and operational responsibilities.
Course Content This course is composed of two parts. In the theoretical sessions, concepts and tools such as cinematography, composition, staging, mise-en-scène and directing will be introduced. These sessions will be accompanied with reviews of sample documents and screening of film fragments. The second part consists of practical sessions. In this part, students will develop and produce a sequence from scratch.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Mastering the portrait – Study of faces in film
3 Camera Workshop – Using the digital cine camera and camera movements Still portraits
4 Approaches to a scene from a cinematographer's standpoint – Equipments
5 Lighting Workshop I
6 Lighting Workshop II “Same lighting” exercise
7 Lighting Workshop III
8 Storyboarding Short music video assignment
9 Blocking and working with actors
10 Film Analysis – Cinematography Film analysis presentation
11 Film Analysis – Directing Film analysis presentation
12 Final project production overview
13 Final projects screening
14 What's next?
15 Review of the semester
16 Review of the semester

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Daniel Arijon, Grammer of the Film Language Silman-James Pr ; Reprint edition (1991)

Blain Brown, Cinematography: Theory and Practice: Image Making for Cinematographers, Directors, and Videographers Focal Press; 1 edition (October 9, 2002)

Steven D. Katz, Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visualizing from Concept to Screen Focal Press; 1 edition (July 31, 1991)

Judith Weston, Directing Actors: Creating Memorable Performances for Film & Television

David Mamet, On Directing Film, Penguin, 1991

Joe Queenan, The Unkindest Cut

Christopher Lukas, Directing for Film and Television, Allworth Press, 2001

Andre Bazin, What is Cinema?, University of California Press, 2004

Bruno Bettelheim, The Uses of Enchantment,  Vintage Books, 2010

Constantin Stanislavski, Creating a Role, Methuen, 1981

Sergei Eisenstein, Film Form, A Harvest / HBJ Book, 1977

Michael Rabiger, Directing; Film Techniques and Aesthetics, Focal Press, 2nd Edition (1997)

 

Suggested Readings/Materials

Joseph V. Mascelli, The Five C's of Cinematography: Motion Picture Filming Techniques, Silman-James Pr; 1st Silman-James Press edition (June 1, 1998).

Walter Murch, In the Blink of an Eye: A Perspective on Film Editing Silman-James Press; 2nd edition (August 1, 2001).

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
15
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
-
-
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
-
-
Homework / Assignments
2
35
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
1
40
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
50
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
2
50
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
2
32
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
2
Study Hours Out of Class
Field Work
-
-
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
-
-
Homework / Assignments
2
15
Presentation / Jury
1
6
Project
1
40
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
140

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1 To develop the habit of critical thinking in areas of cinema and digital media. X
2 To be able to comprehend and discuss theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of cinema and digital media. X
3 To know and understand practices in areas of cinema and digital media as creative and/or business processes. To be able to see these processes from cultural and historical perspectives. X
4 To cultivate awareness in the inter- and multi-disciplinary nature of cinema and digital media, thus developing a dynamic and flexible professional character capable of operating and communicating across a wide range of subject areas. X
5 To develop an understanding of the unity of theory of practice and practice of theory. X
6 To observe norms of work ethic and a thoroughgoing professional ethic. X
7 Endowed with the virtues and skills of being self-disciplined, self-critical and self-managerial, to be able to both work independently and as member of a team. X
8 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programmes in the areas of cinema and digital media and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of cinema and digital media, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale”, Level B1). X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process aimed at the achievement personal and social goals X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest