CDM 470 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Moving Images in a Digital Age
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 470
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This class will examine the changes that occurred in the production and consumption of moving images in the process of digitization. In different weeks, we will focus on various forms of moving images, including Hollywood blockbusters, independent cinema, video installations, and documentaries with an objective to understand how digitization impacts them. We will analyze the cultural effects of novel forms of media, such as popular YouTube videos, which emerged as a result of digitization. We will also assess how digitization transforms audience engagement with moving images.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Explain how digitization changes the production and the audience interaction with moving images.
  • Identify the specific effects of digitization on different forms of moving images.
  • Discuss the ways in which audiences interact with varieties of digitized moving images and changes that occurred in audience consumption of media texts as a result of digitization.
  • Compare the connections between technological advance and the emergence of novel media forms and alternative media aesthetics.
  • Examine how digital media/motion pictures facilitates the construction of new global communities and global interaction.
  • Analyze how digitization impacts the formation and transformation of socio-cultural identities.
Course Content This course analyzes the transformation of moving images through the process of digitization. We will examine how digitization impacts the production and audience use of motion pictures, as well as focusing on the construction of new socio-cultural identities in the global mediascape through digital moving images.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 An Overview of Digital Moving Images Lev Manovich. “What is Digital Cinema?” pp. 1-16.
2 Technological Change and Moving Images Thomas Ohanian and Natalie Phillips. (2000). Digital Filmmaking: The Changing Art and Craft of Making Motion Pictures, pp. 1-17. Michael Allen (2009). ‘Digital Cinema: Virtual Screens.’ In Digital Culture: Understanding New Media, pp. 61-75.
3 The New Cinema: Form and Content Carol Vernallis, Unruly Media: YouTube, Music Video, and the New Digital Cinema, pp. 33-41 and pp. 42-69. Ariel Rogers. (2013). ‘Digital Cinema’s Heterogenous Appeal.’ In Cinematic Appeals: The Experience of New Movie Technologies, pp. 141-177.
4 Hollywood Blockbusters in the Digital Era Ariel Rogers. (2013). ‘Awe and Aggression.’ In Cinematic Appeals: The Experience of New Movie Technologies, pp. 141-177.
5 Art and Digital Aesthetics Adam Lowenstein. (2015). ‘Interactive Spectatorship: Gaming, Mimicry and Art Cinema.’ In Dreaming of Cinema: Spectatorship, Surrealism, and the Age of Digital Media, pp. 43-78. Elizabeth K. Menon. (2007) ‘Virtual Realities, Techno-aesthetics and Metafictions of Digital Culture.’ In The State of the Real: Aesthetics in the Digital Age, pp. 151-161.
6 Digitization and the Question of Realism Jenna Ng. (2007). ‘Virtual Cinematography and the Digital Real: (dis)placing the Moving Image Between Reality and Simulacra.’ In The State of the Real: Aesthetics in the Digital Age, pp. 172-180. Fernando Canet (2015). ‘The New Realistic Trend in Contemporary World Cinema.’ In The Cinema Of Sensations, pp. 269-284
7 Video Installations and Hybrid Art Catherine Elwes, (2015). Installation and the Moving Image, pp. 252-270. Gregory Zinman. (2015). ‘Getting Messy: Chance and Glitch in Contemporary Video Art.’ In Abstract Video: The Moving Image in Contemporary Art pp. 98-115.
8 Digital Affects Debra Ferraday. (2012). ‘Affect, Fantasy and Digital Cultures.’ In Digital Cultures and the Politics of Emotion: Feelings, Affect and Technological Change, pp. 77-93 Michaela Quadraro (2012). ‘Digital Aesthetics and Affective Politics.’ In Digital Cultures and the Politics of Emotion: Feelings, Affect and Technological Change, pp.
9 Digital Documentaries Danny Birchall. (2008). ‘Online Documentary.’ In Rethinking Documentary: New Perspectives and Practices, pp. 278-283. Alexandra Juhasz (2012). ‘Documentary on YouTube.’ In Rethinking Documentary: New Perspectives and Practices, pp. 299-312.
10 Millennial Audiences and Cultural Effects of Moving Images James G. Webster, (2014). The Marketplace of Attention: How Audiences Take Shape in a Digital Age, pp. 4-20 and pp. 49-74.
11 The Global Village and Intercultural Influences Adam Lowenstein. (2015). ‘Globalized Spectatorship: Ring Around the Superflat Global Village.’ In Dreaming of Cinema: Spectatorship, Surrealism, and the Age of Digital Media, pp. 79-116
12 Popular Short Movies and Their Cultural Effects Simon Ruschmeyer. (2012). ‘Shifting Paradigms in Web Video: From Access to Curation.’ In Film in the Post-Media Age, pp. 35-56. Michael Strangelove, Watching YouTube: Extraordinary Videos by Ordinary People, pp. 64-83.
13 Gender and Popular YouTube Videos Emma Maguire (2018). ‘Self-Branding and Hotness in the YouTube Video Blogs of Jenna Marbles.’ In Girls, Autobiography, Media: Gender and Self-Mediation in Digital Economies, pp. 83-102. Michael Strangelove. ‘Women of the Tube’ In Watching YouTube: Extraordinary Videos by Ordinary People, pp. 84-103.
14 Independent Cinema and its Future in Digitized Times Vladan Nikolic, (2017). Independent Filmmaking and Digital Convergence: Transmedia and Beyond, pp. 59-65 and p. 255-264. Christina Lane (2016). ‘Feminist Art in a Changing Technological Landscape.’ In Indie Reframed: Women as Filmmaking and Contemporary American Independent Cinema, pp. 70-86.
15 Review of the semester
16 Final Exam

 

Course Textbooks

The course uses the sources that are listed above in the weekly subjects and related preparations.

References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
50
Presentation / Jury
2
30
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
4
100
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
25
Presentation / Jury
2
5
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
115

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To develop the habit of critical thinking in areas of cinema and digital media. X
2 To be able to comprehend and discuss theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of cinema and digital media. X
3 To know and understand practices in areas of cinema and digital media as creative and/or business processes. To be able to see these processes from cultural and historical perspectives. X
4 To cultivate awareness in the inter- and multi-disciplinary nature of cinema and digital media, thus developing a dynamic and flexible professional character capable of operating and communicating across a wide range of subject areas. X
5 To develop an understanding of the unity of theory of practice and practice of theory. X
6 To observe norms of work ethic and a thoroughgoing professional ethic. X
7 Endowed with the virtues and skills of being self-disciplined, self-critical and self-managerial, to be able to both work independently and as member of a team.
8 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programmes in the areas of cinema and digital media and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of cinema and digital media, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale”, Level B1). X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process aimed at the achievement personal and social goals X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest