CDM 350 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Frameworks: Diverse Practices in Cinema
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 350
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives Introduces and familiarizes the student with a wide range of diverse practices in cinema through examples of artist works historical and contemporary
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Has gained a deep inside in diverse practices in the the realm of cinema
  • Has a deep knowledge and complex understanding of the applications of various forms and techniques in cinematic practices and theories
  • Is familiar with the historical, technical and cultural developments leading to such practices
  • Uses the basics of dialog culture, argues for own standpoints and respects others’ standpoints
  • The Student engages in group discussion and individual reflection, as well as reflection in pairs and small groups; develops and fosters skills of interdisciplinary cooperation as well as dialogue culture.
Course Content This course aims to familiarize the students with diverse practices in cinema. Examples of avantgarde, experimental and found footage cinema will be screened and its theories and artist practices discussed inclass.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the course
2 Visual Aesthetics of Avant-Garde Film Screenings of various avant-garde work.
3 Art and Cinematography Malcolm LeGrice, “Abstract Film and Beyond” The MIT press, (1977)
4 Metaphors on Vision “essential brakhage” documentext 2001
5 Abstract Film Malcolm LeGrice, “Abstract Film and Beyond” The MIT press, (1977)
6 Revolutionary Cinema Manifestos. Jean-Luc Godard, Fernando Solanas, Octavio Gettino, Video Activist Network, Cinegiornali Liberi, Kinoglaz, Dziga Vertov, Harun Farocki
7 Collage/Decollage/Assemblage Guy Debord, Society of the Spectacle
8 Expanded Cinema Readings by Gene Youngblood, Jonas Mekas, Bruce Jenkins
9 Essayist Cinema Chris Marker, Jonas Mekas, Agnes Varda
10 Film and Video Nicky Hamlyn, “Film Art Phenomena” bfi publishing (2003)
11 Visionary Film Maya Deren, “Meshes of the Afternoon” “Divine Horsemen: The Living Gods of Haiti” “An Anagram of Ideas on Art, Form and Film” Readings from Susan Sontag, Jonas Mekas, Marguerite Duras
12 Found Footage Found Footage: Cinema Exposed, edited by: Marente Bloemheuvel, Giovanna Fossati, Jaap Guldemond Amsterdam University Press
13 Mixed Media / Mixed Memories “The Cinematic” edited by David Campany The MIT Press (2007)
14 Mobile Cinema Selected Readings
15 Final Presentations
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Textbooks 1) Rees, A.L. A history of Experimental Film and Video. British Film Institute. 2011 2) Youngblood, Gene. Expanded Cinema, Dutton, 1970 4) Campany, David. The Cinematic. Documents of Contemporary Art. MIT Press 2007 5)MacDonald, Scott. A Critical Cinema: Interviews with Independent Filmmakers. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988 6) Hamlyn, Nicky, “Film Art Phenomena” bfi publishing (2003)
References 1)Wees, William. Light Moving in Time 2) Taylor, Richard and Christie, Ian. Russian and Soviet Cinema in Documents 1896-1939 3) Essential Brakhage edited by McPherson, Bruce R., Documentext 2001 3)UBU Sound and Film Archive: http://www.ubu.com 2)The Early Video Project: http://davidsonsfiles.org/ 3)Radical Software Magazine, 19701974. Web Archive: http://www.radicalsoftware.org/ 4) The Internet Archive: http://www.archive.org 5) http://www.hi-beam.net/cgi-bin/flicker.pl

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
30
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
2
Presentation / Jury
10
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
100

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To develop the habit of critical thinking in areas of cinema and digital media. X
2 To be able to comprehend and discuss theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of cinema and digital media. X
3 To know and understand practices in areas of cinema and digital media as creative and/or business processes. To be able to see these processes from cultural and historical perspectives. X
4 To cultivate awareness in the inter- and multi-disciplinary nature of cinema and digital media, thus developing a dynamic and flexible professional character capable of operating and communicating across a wide range of subject areas. X
5 To develop an understanding of the unity of theory of practice and practice of theory. X
6 To observe norms of work ethic and a thoroughgoing professional ethic. X
7 Endowed with the virtues and skills of being self-disciplined, self-critical and self-managerial, to be able to both work independently and as member of a team. X
8 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programmes in the areas of cinema and digital media and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of cinema and digital media, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale”, Level B1). X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process aimed at the achievement personal and social goals X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest