CDM 330 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Psychoanalysis and Cinema
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 330
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce students to the use of psychoanalysis as a method of film analysis in film studies.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • To identify the key concepts of psychoanalysis.
  • To analyze the representations of gender in cinema.
  • To apply the concepts of psychoanalysis to film studies.
  • To compare significant psychoanalytical approaches within each other.
  • To argue within the context of feminist psychoanalysis.
Course Content This course combines theoretical work and film analysis Theories of psychoanalysis will be applied to the analysis of films, to discuss questions of representation in relation to issues of gender. Students will be expected to write four response papers.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 What is Psychoanalysis? Jacqueline Rose, Sexuality in the Field of Vision. London: Verso, 2005. 27-47. Alenka Zupancic, Why Psychoanalysis. Latvia, NSU Press, 2008.
3 Introduction to Freud Sigmund Freud, Totem and Taboo. London: Routledge, 1950. 1-86.
4 Dreams Screening: Lost Highway (David Lynch, 1997) Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams. New York, NY: Barnes&Noble. 2005. 248-295.
5 Introduction to Lacan Jacques Lacan, Book XI: Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis. New York, NY: W.W. Norton&Company, 1998. 1-60
6 Mirror Stage - Screening: Under the Skin (Jonathan Glazer, 2013) Jacques Lacan, Ecrits. New York, NY: W.W. Norton&Company, 2006. 75-82.
7 Feminist Psychoanalysis and Film Theory - First response paper deadline Laura Mulvey, “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema.” Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. New York: Oxford UP, 1999: 833-44. Joan Copjec, “The Orthopsychic Subject: Film Theory and the Reception of Lacan.” October, vol. 49 (1989): 53-71.
8 Pre-Oedipal Mother - Screening: Babadook (Jennifer Kent, 2014) Melanie Klein, “Early Stages of Oedipus Conflict.” International Journal of Psychoanalysis, vol. 9 (1928): 169-80.
9 Abject and Hysteria - Screening: Possession (Andrzej Zulawski, 1981) Julia Kristeva, Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection. New York: Columbia University Press, 1982. 1-31.
10 Paternity-Maternity - Screening: The Brood (David Cronenberg, 1979) - Second response paper deadline Barbara Creed, Monstrous Feminine. London: Routledge, 1994. 43-58
11 Eros/Thanatos and Gaze Screening: Amer (Helene Cattet, Bruno Forzani, 2009) Sigmund Freud, Beyond the Pleasure Principle. London: Hogart Press, 1920-1922.
12 Gender and Cannibalism Screening: Trouble Every Day (Claire Denis, 2001) Third response paper deadline Julia Kristeva, Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection. New York: Columbia University Press, 1982. 32-55.
13 Love and Masculinity - Screening: The Love Witch (Anna Biller, 2017) Jacques Lacan, Book XX: On Feminine Sexuality the Limits of Love and Knowledge. New York, NY: W.W. Norton&Company, 1998.
14 Film Theory and Psychoanalysis - Screening: Perverts Guide to Cinema (Sophie Fiennes, 2006) - Fourth response paper deadline Jacqueline Rose, Sexuality in the Field of Vision. London: Verso, 2005. 27-47. Alenka Zupancic, Why Psychoanalysis. Latvia, NSU Press, 2008.
15 Review of the Semester
16 Review of the Semester

 

Course Textbooks
References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
25
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
4
75
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
5
100
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
4
13
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
132

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To develop the habit of critical thinking in areas of cinema and digital media. X
2 To be able to comprehend and discuss theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of cinema and digital media. X
3 To know and understand practices in areas of cinema and digital media as creative and/or business processes. To be able to see these processes from cultural and historical perspectives.
4 To cultivate awareness in the inter- and multi-disciplinary nature of cinema and digital media, thus developing a dynamic and flexible professional character capable of operating and communicating across a wide range of subject areas. X
5 To develop an understanding of the unity of theory of practice and practice of theory. X
6 To observe norms of work ethic and a thoroughgoing professional ethic.
7 Endowed with the virtues and skills of being self-disciplined, self-critical and self-managerial, to be able to both work independently and as member of a team. X
8 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programmes in the areas of cinema and digital media and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of cinema and digital media, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale”, Level B1).
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process aimed at the achievement personal and social goals

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest