CDM 203 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Creative Writing
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 203
Fall
2
2
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • The students, who succeeded in this course, will be able to;
  • Gain experience in communicating ideas via creative writing.
  • Gain experience of storytelling in various forms of literature inc. scripting.
  • Develop different points of view on storytelling.
  • Get used to concepts of timing & deadline for creative writing process.
Course Content This course aims to enchance your creative writing & storytelling skills in various genres & formats. Over sixteen weeks, you will learn concept and elements of creative thinking & writing and discover the methods & process of storytelling. IMPORTANT - It is advised to keep an A4 stationery file that can carry your creative work over the course period. Each student will be responsible for their Creative Writing file. These files will become your personal Creative Workbooks during the course & will be evaluated as the final assignment

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 “Elements of Creativity” - Myth of inspiration - Raw material & creative craftsmanship - Storytelling in a nutshell
2 “Writing – A Love & Hate Relationship” - A brief overlook on creative writing process - Interactive storycrafting session
3 “Tricks of Trade” - Levels of reading & writing - Fundamentals of storycrafting - Getting & refining the creative idea - Business card principle - “Six Word Story” Method - Assignment 1
4 “Weapons of Mass Communication” - Defining & designing your world - Choice of time period - Fact, fiction & the inspirational bridge - Workshop
5 “Blunt Force Trauma” - Cold water treatment - Grabbing & keeping attention - Promises & expectations - Workshop
6 “Master of Puppets” - “You are your every character” - Character creation & development - Observation vs. Imagination - Assignment 2
7 “To plot or not to plot.” - Hero’s Journey - Everchanging process of plotting - Space, time & continuum - Turns, twists & what nots. - Expanding your story: Snowflake Method - Assignment 3
8 “Event Management” - The choice: Show or tell? - Tinkering with action & reaction - Motive, drive & conflict - Workshop
9 “Crime & Punishment” - Speed, tempo & harmony - Stakes & balance of a story - Labyrinth Principle - Workshop - Quiz (*)
10 Angels Have Wings. So Do Demons.” - Creating backstories - Creating a web of relations - Loose ends - Assignment 4
11 “You ARE the Camera.” - Choosing your narrative tone - Point of view & shifting it transparently - Writer’s little helper: Real life - Workshop
12 “The Haunted House” - Cliches & avoiding them - Cookie cutters vs reapers - Principles of catchy dialogue - Assignment 5
13 “The Shattered Mirror” - Story adaptation for TV, film & others - Tuning for another format - Technical dependencies - Time & timing - Editing
14 “Breaking Down The Formula.” - Choosing genre & format - Narrative compass - Research & development - Assignment 6
15 “You Shall Not Pass.” - Writers’ block… Fact or fiction? - Facing the scary white paper - Getting unstuck in your story - Red Herring & other tools of trade - Final Quest (Final assignments)
16 The Conclusion - Review & critique of final assignments - Comparison of weeks 1 & 16

 

Course Textbooks
References On Writing (Stephen King), Story (Robert McKee), The Comic Toolbox (John Vorhaus)

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
10
Homework / Assignments
6
60
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
8
100
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
2
Homework / Assignments
6
6
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
12
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
146

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To develop the habit of critical thinking in areas of cinema and digital media. X
2 To be able to comprehend and discuss theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of cinema and digital media. X
3 To know and understand practices in areas of cinema and digital media as creative and/or business processes. To be able to see these processes from cultural and historical perspectives. X
4 To cultivate awareness in the inter- and multi-disciplinary nature of cinema and digital media, thus developing a dynamic and flexible professional character capable of operating and communicating across a wide range of subject areas. X
5 To develop an understanding of the unity of theory of practice and practice of theory. X
6 To observe norms of work ethic and a thoroughgoing professional ethic. X
7 Endowed with the virtues and skills of being self-disciplined, self-critical and self-managerial, to be able to both work independently and as member of a team. X
8 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programmes in the areas of cinema and digital media and to possess advanced level computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of cinema and digital media, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale”, Level B1). X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process aimed at the achievement personal and social goals X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest